Dr. Jeremiah Ingold
Link home / 1859 Cafe

A Church in the Making

Among the first settlers in the vicinity of Hickory Tavern in the mid-nineteenth century were Adolphus L. Shuford and Henry W. Link, loyal members of the German Reformed Church. In 1860, these men sought the services of Dr. Jeremiah Ingold, pastor of the Grace Charge, to begin Reformed worship services in their town.

During the warm months, Dr. Ingold led services in an outdoor shelter. In the winter, he preached in the home of Henry Link (the site of the 1859 Cafe, until it closed in 2011). In 1868, Dr. Ingold established Hickory’s first school, the Free Academy. The Academy also became host to Reformed worship services that year, because the outdoor stand burned. The Academy also hosted worship services by many other denominations, as well as entertainment shows.

Sketch of the first building

Corinth in 1869

On May 22, 1869, twenty-two charter members founded Corinth Reformed Church. Later they built a church structure in what is now Robinson Park, which served as their home from 1874 to 1887.

The "Little Brick Church"

Corinth in 1887

A brick church at the corner of the present Second Street and Trade Avenue NW was Corinth’s meeting place from 1887 to 1910. It was Hickory’s first brick church, and was the first place of worship in Hickory to install a pipe organ, which was purchased from the Church of the Good Shepherd for $200.

Corinth's third building

Corinth in 1910

By 1905, the “Little Brick Church” was too little. In October 1909, under the leadership of Rev. Joseph L. Murphy, the growing congregation laid the cornerstone of a spacious, beautiful sanctuary in downtown Hickory. This site at 2nd Street and 1st Avenue NW (where BB&T is now located) would be Corinth’s home for half a century.

Our current home

Corinth in 1959

As the post-war generation expanded the church with young families, it became apparent that an educational wing would need to be added, or the church would once again need to relocate. Shuford Mills donated 10 acres of land on 16th Avenue NW, where Corinth’s current Gothic sanctuary was built and dedicated on Sunday, September 6, 1959.

Abernethy Student Center
Bost Memorial Hall
Mitchell House (West Campus)

Corinth in 2013

In response to a growing number of students (6-12th grade) in the congregation, the Abernethy Student Center was built behind the education building and Sanctuary in 2008. That building currently houses junior and senior high Sunday school classes, Wednesday night youth CREW, and Big City Studio worship.

As the contemporary worship service grew, it became obvious that the original fellowship hall was no longer sufficient. In January 2013, Bost Memorial Hall was opened as a new multi-purpose facility for contemporary worship, Wednesday night dinners, and other special events.

In December 2013, Corinth acquired an adjacent residential property, which was thoroughly renovated to become new adult education spaces. The West Campus includes the Mitchell House (classrooms and meeting rooms), the POTS House (large class or meeting room), the Mitchell House Extension (two smaller classrooms) and the Minnie & BB Lane Mission House (guest house).

Corinth’s Legacy Continues…

Today, Corinth is a vibrant and growing church. As we prepare for our 150th anniversary (May 22, 2019), we are actively reflecting on how God has used Corinth over the past 150 years, and how God might use us in the next 150. We are celebrating our many blessings, and making strategic plans that we pray will help us to stay strong, healthy, and relevant in the coming years.

For more information…

To learn more about the heritage of Corinth, including our connection to the SALT Block and how we came to have “Boy Scout Troop 1,” contact us and ask for a copy of the 125th Anniversary Booklet.

The church office also has copies of a 2009 booklet (“Remembering…”) from the 50th anniversary celebration of our current Gothic building. It has many more details about the construction and maintenance our current home.